Resources

 

Brand/Identity

Marketing Materials

Talking Points

Campaign

  1. It is modeled after a Hawaii campaign that experienced a significant increase (14.7% in one year) in the number of students who completed at least 15 credits a semester.
  2. For most degree programs at Kentucky’s public institutions, associate degrees are 60 credits and bachelor’s degrees are 120 credits.
  3. “On-time” graduation for most associate’s degrees is considered two years; for bachelor’s degrees, it is four years.

College Readiness Components

  1. Kentucky students who are college ready when they enter college are twice as likely to graduate compared to students who require developmental coursework.
  2. Although developmental education courses count when figuring course tuition costs, they do not count towards the necessary 30 credits a year for completion of a degree program.

Financial Information

  1. Adding an extra year to college is expensive. For KCTCS students, it adds an estimated $4,320 in just tuition costs. At the state universities, it adds an average of $8,400 a year.
  2. 57% of Kentucky public university students who graduated in 2012 had on average $24,945 of debt after graduation. (Excludes the University of Kentucky.)

Workforce Implications

  1. By 2020, 56% of Kentucky’s jobs will require postsecondary education, making degrees and credentials even more essential.
  2. Median income for associate degree holders in Kentucky is $33,200; and $37,000 for bachelor’s degree holders.
  3. On average, associate degree holders earn nearly $300,000 more than high school graduates over a lifetime of working, while those with a bachelor’s degree earn nearly $900,000 more.

Student Trends

  1. 75% of first-time, full-time freshmen at Kentucky’s public institutions earn less than 30 credit hours a year.
  2. First-time, full-time students are less likely to take 15 hours per semester as they remain in college.
  3. Average college students only spend 16% of their week either attending class or studying.
  4. Three out of four first-time, full-time freshmen at Kentucky’s public institutions earn less than 30 hours their first year of college, making them already off track to graduate on time by their sophomore year.
  5. When public university students complete 30 credits by the end of their freshman year, they are four times more likely to graduate on time than those who complete less than 30.
  6. When community college students complete 30 credits by the end of their freshman year, they are over 10 times more likely to graduate on time than those who complete less than 30.

Reports

Videos

Sponsored by the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education


15 to Finish Kentucky is based off 15 to Finish, a campaign of the University of Hawai’i's Graduation Initiative.